Dan's Web Definitions

Below you will find some definitions of different words that involve computers and what not. You are able to navigate to different letters by clicking on the letters below. Have fun!

2 words that I find interesting are Chrome and Gaming Network. I liek Chrome because it is the number 1 browser that I go to and use regularly, and I like Gaming Network because I like to play video games and those kinds of things are interesting to me.

I found all these words on Netlingo.

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A

Adobe
Adobe Systems Incorporated Known as Adobe, and founded in 1982, it is a company that builds award-winning software solutions for network publishing, including Web, print, video, wireless, and broadband applications. Its graphic design, imaging, dynamic media, and authoring tools enable people to create, publish, and deliver visually rich content for various types of media. The company's products are used by graphic designers, Web designers, publishers, data-heavy organizations, and business and consumer users. Adobe is the second largest PC software company in the U.S., with headquarters in San Jose, California. Be sure to also read through these definitions: Acrobat, PDF, PGML, Photoshop, PostScript.

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B

Backwards Compatible
A term used to describe a program's ability to read a file created in an earlier version of it.

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C

Chrome
Google's browser A browser created by Google, it is a program used to view, download, upload, surf, or otherwise access documents (for example, Web pages) on the Internet. According to Google, Chrome is a browser that combines a minimal design with sophisticated technology to make interacting with the Web faster, safer, and easier.

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D

Dedicated Server
In the Web-hosting business, a dedicated server is a rented service; a user rents the server, the software, and an Internet connection from the hosting company that maintains it. On a network, a dedicated server is a single computer that is "set aside" for serving the needs of the network, usually to manage communications and printer resources. Not all servers are dedicated; it is possible for a computer to act as a server and to perform other functions, as well.

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E

eBay
eBay, Inc. Known as the world's largest online marketplace, eBay is a company with an online auction site that enables people to buy and sell goods and services on a local, national, and international basis. In 1995, computer programmer Pierre Omidyar auctioned off a broken laser printer on his Web site for $14.83 (the buyer was a collector of broken laser pointers). Within two years, Omidyar registered his consulting firm, Echo Bay Technology Group, as eBay.com. Led by CEO Meg Whitman, eBay has more than 29 million registered users and is the most popular shopping site on the Net (when measured by total user minutes). While Amazon.com is the poster child for e-commerce and Yahoo! the poster child for the first generation of the Internet, eBay has quietly become the only large, successful consumer Internet survivor to date. Every hour, for instance, 10 diamond rings, 120 PCs, and 1,200 articles of clothing are sold; a Corvette is sold on the site every three hours. In the year 2000, the eBay community transacted more than $5 billion in annualized gross merchandise sales, and, eBay has actually spawned a large number of people (see: intrapreneur) who have turned their part-time passions into full-time, well-paying jobs, simply by selling their goods online! If you have a comic collection, memorabilia, or some other kind of product that you're ready to sell, this is the place to post it.

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F

Firewall
A traditional firewall is a specially programmed computer system that "stands" between an organization's LAN and the Internet. It is a security measure used by many companies to prevent hackers and other unauthorized users from accessing internal networks. The firewall computer is set up to monitor traffic and to keep unauthorized crackers from tampering with the system, thereby protecting a private network from a public network. Firewalls are also set up to protect the security of servers. A personal firewall is software that is installed on an user's PC which controls communications to and from the user's PC. It differs from the traditional firewall in that a personal firewall will not protect any more than the one PC it is installed on (unless other PCs are sharing Internet connectivity via the protected PC). It is also different from a conventional firewall in the sense that permits or denys communications based on security measures, for example, your firewall program will prompt you each time a connection is attempted, and based on which sites you allow, it will remember your preferences and determine which Internet traffic you allow on your PC. So if you see an adware program trying to get through, all you do is deny it! Personal firewalls also provide a level of intrusion detection, meaning it will terminate or block connectivity when it suspects an intrusion is being attempted (by spyware, for example). The term comes from firefighting; a firewall is a barrier established to prevent the spread of fire. Experts agree that a firewall is considered a first line of defense in protecting private information and for greater security, data can be encrypted.

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G

Gaming Network
A network of PCs linked together through a gaming server, it allows users to play together simultaneously from practically anywhere in the world.

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H

Hacker
a.k.a. a hacker -or- hacking A computer enthusiast who enjoys learning everything about a computer system and, through clever programming, pushes the system to its highest possible level of performance. Often confused with crackers, these hobbyists are skilled programmers with the reputation of having a mischievous bent for breaking into secured systems. In one sense, a hacker is a person who enjoys programming rather than just theorizing about it. In another sense, the term "hacker" tends to connote membership within a global community defined by computer networks; it implies that the person subscribes to some version of the hacker ethic. Hacking has been going on since computers were invented, and sometimes there have been extremely damaging consequences. A variety of old-time hackers have now "gone commercial" and taken hacking to the business level (they are now referred to as "ethical hackers"). For example, they use their hacking skills to develop penetration tools, and then they go out and analyze a customer's networks for security vulnerabilities, in order to report the findings back to the customer. Hacker wannabes take note: It is better to be described as a hacker by others than to describe oneself that way. Most hackers consider themselves something of an elite (a meritocracy based on ability), although new members are said to be gladly welcome.

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I

IBM
IBM Corporation (IBM stands for International Business Machines), a.k.a. Big Blue Known informally as "Big Blue," IBM is one of the largest, most well-known corporations that designs and manufactures computer systems, software, networking systems, storage devices, and microelectronics. Credited with inventing the first PC, in 1981, they are known for many inventions (including the "casual Friday" dress code, a button-up blue shirt and a pair of khaki pants). Joking aside, IBM is responsible for many innovative products. Be sure to also read through: ASP, BITNET, Bluetooth, Customer Information Control System (CICS), Data Encryption Standard (DES), holy war, IBM-PC, Mac, mainframe, MS-DOS, OS, PAN, PC-compatible, personal computer, PGML, reverse engineering, SQL, and wild ducks.

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J

JavaScript
A scripting language to enable Web page authors to design interactive sites. Although it shares many of the features and structures of the full Java language, it was developed independently. JavaScript can interact with HTML source code, enabling Web developers to jazz up their sites with dynamic content. For example, it makes it easy to respond to user-initiated events (such as form input) without having to use CGI. JavaScript is endorsed by a number of software companies and is an open source language that anyone can use without purchasing a license. It is supported by recent versions of Netscape and Microsoft browsers, although the latter (Internet Explorer) only supports a subset that Microsoft calls Jscript.

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K

Kill Switch
The so-called "kill switch" describes the manner in which the U.S. President could "turn off" the Internet without a court having to approve the decision.

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L

LCD
Liquid Crystal Display The screen used on flat panel monitors, digital watches, PDAs, pagers, cell phones, televisions, and so on. It makes use of liquid crystals to display information.

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M

Macintosh
Apple Computer revolutionized the personal computer business with the introduction of the Macintosh in early 1984. Macintosh not only refers to the model of the computer but also the operating system called the Mac OS. Macs were the first computers to feature a graphical user interface (GUI) that utilizes windows, icons, and a mouse, thereby making it easy for most anyone to use a computer. Rather than having to learn a complex set of commands to type, a user can point to a selection on a menu and click a mouse button. Moreover, the GUI is embedded into the operating system, so all Mac applications have a similar appearance. Once a user becomes familiar with one application, he or she will be familiar with other applications. In fact, it's been acknowledged that the success of the Macintosh GUI began a new age of graphics-based applications and operating systems. (Indeed, the Windows 95 version looked more like a Mac than Windows 3.0 because it copied many features from the Mac.) There are now many different Macintosh models, with varying degrees of speed and power (and color combinations), based on the PowerPC microprocessor. People may ask you what kind of computer you have and, as a newbie, you can say "a Mac" or "a PC." (Even though a Mac is a PC, people generally use the term PC to refer to PC-compatible computers, such as IBM, Dell, Sony, and HP.) It used to be that you'd answer "a Mac" or "an IBM" because those were essentially the only two computers that individuals owned (see: IBM-compatible). The Macintosh has a large and loyal following of users, and it is the preference of graphic designers. Like the Internet, the Mac literally transformed computing culture.

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N

Netbook
a.k.a. mini notebooks, subnotebook, companion device, notebook A small, very light, and inexpensive laptop computer with limited memory, "netbooks" are best suited for general computing and accessing web-based applications. Basically they are nothing more than smaller, cheaper laptops.

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O

Online
not OnLine or on-line The state of being connected to the Internet (generally through an ISP, an OSP, or a network). Used as an adjective, it describes a variety of activities that users do on the Internet, for example: online chat, online shopping, online games, online searching, online communities, and on and on. Note that some people think the word "online" in America Online should be spelled as "OnLine" since the "L" is part of the acronym in "AOL." However, the "L" in AOL is just there to make up a better acronym than simply "AO."

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P

PayPal
PayPal, Inc. PayPal enables any business or consumer with an e-mail address to securely, conveniently, and cost-effectively send and receive payments online. It is a network built upon the existing financial infrastructure of bank accounts and credit cards to create a global, real-time payment solution. In other words, they provide a Web-based service that enables users to send and receive payments electronically. It works like this: As a customer or consumer, you open an account on PayPal.com and register your credit card; the next time you want to pay someone for a piece of jewelry you bought on an online auction, for example, or to reimburse a friend for dinner last night, you can charge your card by transferring funds from your PayPal account into that person's PayPal account. As a seller or online merchant, you open an account on PayPal.com and either use their shopping cart or your own to accept all major credit cards, debit cards, bank transfers, and PayPal payments securely. Basically customers shop on your website and pay on PayPal. PayPal is the number one payment service on eBay and has been used on millions of auctions (eBay later acquired them). PayPal has become the global standard for online payments and is offered in more than 37 countries.

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Q

QR Code
Created by Japanese corporation Denso-Wave in 1994, a "QR code" is a matrix code (which is a two-dimensional bar code) that is a two-dimensional way of representing information. It is similar to a linear (1-dimensional) bar code, but has more data representation capability. Initially used for tracking parts in vehicle manufacturing, QR codes are now used in a broader context including both commercial tracking applications and convenience-oriented applications aimed at mobile phone users (known as mobile tagging).

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R

Real-Time
Most commonly used to describe a form of technology that allows you to see, hear, or access something instantaneously.

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S

SD Card
A Secure Digital (SD) card is a tiny memory card used to make storage portable among various devices, such as car navigation systems, cell phones, e-books, PDAs, smart phones, digital cameras, music players, and personal computers. An SD card features a high data transfer rate and low battery consumption, both primary considerations for portable devices. It uses flash memory to provide nonvolatile storage, which means that a power source is not required to retain stored data. An SD card is about the size of a postage stamp and weighs approximately two grams. It is similar in size to a MultiMediaCard, but smaller than older memory card types such as the SmartMedia card and the CompactFlash card. Both MMC and SD cards provide encryption capabilities for protected content to ensure secure distribution of copyrighted material, such as digital music, video, and e-books. SD cards are available with storage capacities as high as 4 gigabytes. The SD card was jointly developed by Matsushita, SanDisk, and Toshiba.

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T

Terabyte
A unit of memory measurement (2 to the 40th power) equal to approximately one trillion bytes (actually 1,099,511,627,776 bytes). One terabyte is equal to 1,000 gigabytes.

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U

User
a.k.a. users -or- visitors A term that defines the online audience, it also refers to anyone who "uses" a computer. The term "users" rubs some people the wrong way because, in the past, if you said you were a user, it meant you were habitually consuming an illicit drug. Nowadays, a user is a person who is online. It comes from techies, who refer to people as "computer users." A user is a particular individual who accesses a Web site. The general nature of the ISP service and individual user actions can make identifying and tracking a user from visit to visit challenging in the Web environment. Whenever possible cookies are employed for this task. When cookies are not available, the user's IP address is used.

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V

Video Server
A server that stores and transmits multimedia applications across a broadband interactive network, in either a client/server or distributed computing configuration.

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W

Web Server
Using the client/server model and the World Wide Web's HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP), it's a software program that serves Web page files to users.

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X

Xerox PARC
Xerox Palo Alto Research Center In 1970, Xerox Corporation gathered together a team of world-class researchers and gave them the mission of creating "the architecture of information." The scientists of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) lived up to this challenge by inventing personal distributed computing, graphical user interfaces (GUI), the first commercial mouse, bitmapped displays, Ethernet, client/server architecture, object-oriented programming, laser printing, and many of the basic protocols of the Internet. PARC technologies have changed the world. Director John Seely Brown, a brilliant technologist and business thinker, advocates that it is time to look beyond our obsession with technology and information and rather appreciate how social networks (the people-to-people kind) shape ideas of how we work and how we live. PARC's motto: The easiest way to predict the future is to invent it.

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Y

YouTube
Founded in February 2005, YouTube is the world's most popular online video community, allowing millions of people to watch and share user-generated videos. YouTube provides a forum for people to connect, inform, and inspire others across the globe and acts as a distribution platform for original content creators and advertisers large and small. YouTube is an independent subsidiary of Google Inc., having been acquired in November of 2006. Basically, YouTube allows people to easily upload and share video clips on YouTube.com and across the Internet through websites, mobile devices, blogs, and e-mail. Everyone can participate in the YouTube community by watching, sharing, and commenting on videos. People can see first-hand accounts of current events, relive their favorite TV moments, find videos about their hobbies and interests, discover new artists and filmmakers, and even uncover the quirky and unusual.

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Z

Zaplet
An e-mail-based communication and collaboration application, it combines the best of e-mail, instant messaging, and the Web. Zaplets are easy to create (using a point-and-click template with built in features you can add) and easy to send (you fire it off as an e-mail to your target group). The Zaplet arrives in everyone's in-box just like e-mail, but when a recipient replies to or updates his or her copy of it, every member of the group has instant access to the new data as soon as they reopen their Zaplet. Zaplets work with popular e-mail clients and Web browsers and are used to poll coworkers, streamline hiring and budgeting processes, schedule meetings or parties, or tackle most any business task that requires teamwork.