Alex Perez's Web Definitions

I have been learning how to code webpages in Intro to Web Design. This is my webpage full of terms and definitions. In this page there are many terms and definitions. I have been assigned to collect all these terms and you can find all of them below. You will be able to navigate around the page by clicking on the links.

I find Internet as one of the most intersting terms in this, because without it we wouldn't be able to do anyhting on the computer. We would have to find another way to be productive, we wouldn't be able to hear about news as soon, and we wont be able to communicate to others. I find upload very important as well. Many people upload information everyday. We upload Documents, files, programs, and even more.

When working on this assignment all the defenitions were found on "Netlingo" and some on "Tech Terms"

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A

Apache
Apache is the most popular Web server software. It enables a computer to host one or more websites that can be accessed over the Internet using a Web browser.

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B

Botnet
A botnet is a group of computers that are controlled from a single source and run related software programs and scripts. While botnets can be used for distributed computing purposes, such as a scientific processing, the term usually refers to multiple computers that have been infected with malicious software.

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C

Cookie
A funny name for a noun that describes a small piece of information about you (about your computer, actually).It is a small file that a Web server automatically sends to your PC when you browse certain Web sites. Cookies are stored as text files on your hard drive so servers can access them when you return to Web sites you've visited before

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D

Disk Drive
A disk drive is a device that reads and/or writes data to a disk. The most common type of disk drive is a hard drive (or "hard disk drive"), but several other types of disk drives exist as well. Some examples include removable storage devices, floppy drives, and optical drives, which read optical media, such as CDs and DVDs.

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E

Encryption
The process of protecting information as it moves from one computer to another. Passing through a complex mathematical process (an encryption algorithm), the information is encoded before it is sent and decoded with a secret key when it is received. Without this key, the information is undecipherable

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F

Facebook
Facebook is a website (referred to as a "social utility") that connects people with friends and others who work, study, and live around them. People use Facebook to keep up with friends, upload an unlimited number of photos, share links and videos, and learn more about the people they meet. It is considered a social networking site because people it contains profiles, semi-persistent public commentary on the profile, and a traversable publicly articulated social network displayed in relation to the profile (which basically means you can view information about a person, make comments to them, and see who their friends are)

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G

Gigahertz
One gigahertz is equal to 1,000 megahertz (MHz) or 1,000,000,000 Hz. It is commonly used to measure computer processing speeds. For many years, computer CPU speeds were measured in megahertz, but after personal computers eclipsed the 1,000 Mhz mark around the year 2000, gigahertz became the standard measurement unit. After all, it is easier to say "2.4 Gigahertz" than "2,400 Megahertz."

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H

Hard Drive
A data storage medium that houses all of the electronic information and software programs on your computer. It is one of the most important pieces of hardware inside your PC

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I

IP Address
A numeric address that is given to servers and users connected to the Internet. For servers, it is translated into a domain name, by a Domain Name Server (DNS). For users, it is assigned by the Internet Service Provider (ISP) when the user goes online. This IP address might be the same number each time you log on (called a static IP), or it might be a newly assigned number each time you connect, based on what's available. Most Internet users prefer the static IP because some Internet telephony programs, for example, such as CUSeeMe, need your current IP address to make a connection.

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J

JSP
A technique for integrating a server's Java applications within the Web server.

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K

Keyboard
The peripheral used to input information into a computer or some other form of digital device. It provides a set of alphabetic, numeric, punctuation, symbol, and control keys. When a character is pressed, it sends a coded input to the computer, which then displays a character on the screen. When you hear the term "numeric keypad," it refers to the set of numbers on the right-hand side of some keyboards (not the numbers in the top row, above the letters). Numeric keypads also refer to the numbers (and corresponding letters) on a cell phone.

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L

Linux
reated by Linus Torvalds in 1991 and developed collaboratively over the Internet, Linux is a success story of open source software development. Technically, Linux is actually a kernel (one of the essential components of an operating system) and not an operating system itself; rather, it implements the Unix kernel. (The name Linux is derived from "Linus" plus "Unix.") Linux is typically used in combination with the GNU operating system. It was released as freeware for a variety of hardware platforms and became popular on the Internet as the power operating system of choice for many users (even though the operating system is actually GNU-Linux).

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M

Megabyte
A million bytes or one thousand kilobytes
Malware
Slang for "malicious code," this term was primarily used by computer security programmers. For example, "Certain kinds of malware can be injected into a phone with the intent of destroying its functions." Regarding the Internet, this term is often heard in conjunction with hackers who use certain kinds of malware to infect computer systems and compromise the way they work. For example, "The hacker was arrested for setting up a botnet which sent out spam and bombard Web sites with massive amounts of data, thus shutting them down."

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N

Navigation Bar
A navigation bar is a user interface element within a webpage that contains links to other sections of the website. In most cases, the navigation bar is part of the main website template, which means it is displayed on most, if not all, pages within the website. This means that no matter what page you are viewing, you can use the navigation bar to visit other sections of the website.

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O

OS X
The first Unix-based operating system developed by Apple. Although OS X looks similar to the Macintosh operating system, it has been completely rewritten from the ground up and signals a major shift in compatibility with the much larger wintel market segment. All legacy Mac apps can still be used on OS X (this is done by emulating the "Classic MacOS" within OS X, thus running one operating system within another) - See more at: http://www.netlingo.com/word/os-x.php#sthash.XcmPnXgz.dpuf

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P

Password
A combination of letters and other symbols needed to login to a computer system or program. It is a good idea to make your passwords as cryptic as possible to keep unauthorized users out of your personal or business files. It is also a good idea to change your passwords at least every six of months.

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Q

Queue
A waiting area for e-mail messages, files, print jobs, or anything else that is being sent from one device to another. With e-mail, it is common (and some say cost-effective) to compose letters offline, place them in a queue, and send them all at once, when you get back online.

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R

ROM
Built-in computer memory that can be read but not written to. ROM contains the programming that allows your computer to boot up each time you turn it on, and it contains essential system programs that neither you or the computer can erase. Unlike a computer's random access memory (RAM), ROM does not lose its data when the computer power is turned off. It is sustained by a small, long-life battery. (If you ever run the hardware setup procedure on your computer, you are in effect writing to ROM.)

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S

Server Error
An error message indicating there is an error occurring on the server. Server errors have codes in the 500 range.

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T

Toggle Key
A toggle key toggles the input from a group of keys on a keyboard between two different input modes. The most common toggle key is Caps Lock, which toggles the letter keys between lowercase and uppercase mode. Some keyboards also have other toggle keys, such as Num Lock, Scroll Lock, and Insert. Below is a list of toggle keys and their functions.

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U

Username
The name you use to access certain programs, Web sites, software, or networks. A username is like a handle for a user on the Internet and is commonly left up to the user to select (although most systems will not allow the same username to be assigned to two different people). Usually it's the first part of your e-mail address, before the @ sign, or it could be the nickname you use in a chat room.

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V

VPN
Private Network" (not a successor to the UPN television network). VPN is a network term that most computer users don't need to know, but at least you can impress your friends by talking about it. A virtual private network is "tunneled" through a wide area network WAN such as the Internet. This means the network does not have to be located in one physical location like a LAN. However, by using encryption and other security measures, a VPN can scramble all the data sent through the wide area network, so the network is "virtually" private.

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W

Wi-Fi
A high-speed wireless networking standard (at 11Mbps and increasing to 20Mbps), it is a leading RF technology backed by Apple and 3Com. Dubbed "Wi-Fi" (because that's easier to remember than 802.11b), it refers to QoS in the continuous transmission of high-bandwidth video and multimedia information. Wi-Fi differs from HomeRF in that it repeatedly pushes signals through broader bands of frequency within the radio frequency spectrum. It differs from Bluetooth in that it is designed to serve the wireless LAN market rather than the more personal space that Bluetooth reaches.

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X

XMP
A high-speed wireless networking standard (at 11Mbps and increasing to 20Mbps), it is a leading RF technology backed by Apple and 3Com. Dubbed "Wi-Fi" (because that's easier to remember than 802.11b), it refers to QoS in the continuous transmission of high-bandwidth video and multimedia information. Wi-Fi differs from HomeRF in that it repeatedly pushes signals through broader bands of frequency within the radio frequency spectrum. It differs from Bluetooth in that it is designed to serve the wireless LAN market rather than the more personal space that Bluetooth reaches.

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Y

Yobibyte
A yobibyte is a unit of data storage that equals 2 to the 80th power, or 1,208,925,819,614,629,174,706,176 bytes.

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Z

Zone File
A zone file is stored on a name server and provides information about one or more domain names. Each zone file contains a list of DNS records with mappings between domain names and IP addresses. These records define the IP address of a domain name, the reverse lookup of an IP to other domains, and contain DNS and mail server information.

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